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   A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, often landing in a plunge pool below.<br /><br /><br /><br />Enjoy our fun waterfall facts for kids. Learn interesting information about waterfalls including where they are found, how waterfalls form, different types, how they are used to produce electricity and much more. Read on to find out everything you’ve ever wanted to know about waterfalls!<br /><br /><br /><br />Erosion plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. As a stream flows, it carries sediment that can erode the soft bed rock (limestone and sandstone) underneath. Eventually this cuts deep enough so that only harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as the granite forms cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion. Stream velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can flatten rocks at the edge. The plunge pool at the base gets bigger as rushing water and sediment erodes it and the area behind the waterfall is worn away, creating cave-like shelters.<br /><br />Other process that form waterfalls include earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcanoes which can disrupt the land of a stream bed creating cliffs, cracks, faults and other changes in elevation.<br /><br />The tallest waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela where the water falls 979 m (3,212 ft). The fall is so long that at warmer times of the year the water turns into mist before it reaches the stream below.<br /><br />The valley of Lauterbrunnen in Switzerland is a deep glacial formed valley that contains 72 waterfalls. The streams flowing from the mountains on either side, reach the rocky verge walls of the valley and cascade over. The most famous of the waterfalls is the Staubbach Falls less than 1 km from Lauterbrunnen village.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br /><br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography   #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #victoria #zimbabwe #zambia #africa #african #zimbabwean #zambian <br />#mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography    
City’s Lifeguards Make Waves At Annual Challenge Event<br /><br />Lifeguards from leisure centres across the city put their skills to the test to see who would be crowned Leeds's top poolside patrollers. The annual Leeds Lifeguard Challenge saw the team from Kirkstall Leisure Centre emerge as the overall winners after a day of competition which included first aid simulations and relay races. Now in its 19th year, the friendly contest is designed to help recognise the city's lifeguards while they practice their key skills and work as a team. Held at the John Charles Centre for Sport, the event saw ten teams from Aireborough, Armley, Holt Park, John Charles, John Smeaton, Kippax, Kirkstall, Pudsey, Rothwell and Scott Hall centres battle it out. Other winners on the day included Holt Park Active, who were victorious in a rope throw relay, and Scott Hall Leisure Centre, who were the best in the simulated pool incident. Mark Sugden, centre manager at Kirkstall Leisure Centre, said: “The team really enjoyed the day and we're all very proud that they were named overall winners. “It's great that they've got the recognition they deserve and also had to chance to work alongside teams from other centres and practice their skills.” Leeds City Council lifeguards undergo National Pool Lifeguard Qualification training which includes water rescue, spinal injury management, life support and first aid. The John Charles Centre was also named the Royal Life Saving Society's approved training centre of the year for 2013. Councillor Lucinda Yeadon, Leeds City Council's executive member for digital and creative technologies, culture and skills, said: “The Lifeguard Challenge is always a really fun and exciting day that gives our lifeguards a great chance to get together for a bit of friendly competition. “But it also highlights the important role they play in keeping thousands of swimmers across the city safe each and every day as they enjoy our pools and leisure centres. “Lifeguards have to be constantly alert and ready to act at any time and they're a real credit to the city. Congratulations to the team at Kirkstall Leisure Centre too on a well-deserved win.” For more information on Leeds's lifeguard training, visit: http://www.leeds.gov.uk/sports/Pages/Coach-education.aspx Source: http://www.yorkshiretimes.co.uk/<br />http://leedsinnews.com/citys-lifeguards-make-waves-at-annual-challenge-event-2/
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Amazing Waterfall<br /><br /><br />Enjoy our fun waterfall facts for kids. Learn interesting information about waterfalls including where they are found, how waterfalls form, different types, how they are used to produce electricity and much more. Read on to find out everything you’ve ever wanted to know about waterfalls!<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, often landing in a plunge pool below.<br /><br />Erosion plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. As a stream flows, it carries sediment that can erode the soft bed rock (limestone and sandstone) underneath. Eventually this cuts deep enough so that only harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as the granite forms cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion. Stream velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can flatten rocks at the edge. The plunge pool at the base gets bigger as rushing water and sediment erodes it and the area behind the waterfall is worn away, creating cave-like shelters.<br /><br />Other process that form waterfalls include earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcanoes which can disrupt the land of a stream bed creating cliffs, cracks, faults and other changes in elevation.<br /><br />The tallest waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela where the water falls 979 m (3,212 ft). The fall is so long that at warmer times of the year the water turns into mist before it reaches the stream below.<br /><br />The valley of Lauterbrunnen in Switzerland is a deep glacial formed valley that contains 72 waterfalls. The streams flowing from the mountains on either side, reach the rocky verge walls of the valley and cascade over. The most famous of the waterfalls is the Staubbach Falls less than 1 km from Lauterbrunnen village.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br /><br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography   #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #victoria #zimbabwe #zambia #africa #african #zimbabwean #zambian <br />#mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography    
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 Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography #clouds #iceland #landscape #long #exposure #seljalandfoss #sky #storm   #purity #gif #cinemagraph #earth #beauty #water   #usa #america   #pictures #photos #photography #photographer #photooftheday #pictureoftheday #beautifulpictures #beautifulplaces #nature  
A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, often landing in a plunge pool below.<br /><br />Erosion plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. As a stream flows, it carries sediment that can erode the soft bed rock (limestone and sandstone) underneath. Eventually this cuts deep enough so that only harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as the granite forms cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion. Stream velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can flatten rocks at the edge. The plunge pool at the base gets bigger as rushing water and sediment erodes it and the area behind the waterfall is worn away, creating cave-like shelters.<br /><br />Other process that form waterfalls include earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcanoes which can disrupt the land of a stream bed creating cliffs, cracks, faults and other changes in elevation.<br /><br />The tallest waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela where the water falls 979 m (3,212 ft). The fall is so long that at warmer times of the year the water turns into mist before it reaches the stream below.<br /><br />The valley of Lauterbrunnen in Switzerland is a deep glacial formed valley that contains 72 waterfalls. The streams flowing from the mountains on either side, reach the rocky verge walls of the valley and cascade over. The most famous of the waterfalls is the Staubbach Falls less than 1 km from Lauterbrunnen village.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography #clouds #iceland #landscape #long #exposure #seljalandfoss #sky #storm   #purity #gif #cinemagraph #earth #beauty #water   #usa #america   #pictures #photos #photography #photographer #photooftheday #pictureoftheday #beautifulpictures #beautifulplaces #nature  

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.

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#trendingnow">Iguazu Falls<br /><br /><br />Iguazu Falls, Iguazú Falls, Iguassu Falls, or Iguaçu Falls (Portuguese: Cataratas do Iguaçu [kataˈɾatɐʒ du iɡwaˈsu]; Spanish: Cataratas del Iguazú [kataˈɾatas ðel iɣwaˈsu]; Guarani: Chororo Yguasu [ɕoɾoɾo ɨɣʷasu]) are waterfalls of the Iguazu River on the border of the Argentina province of Misiones and the Brazilian state of Paraná. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The Iguazu River rises near the city of Curitiba. For most of its course, the river flows through Brazil, however, most of the falls are on the Argentine side. Below its confluence with the San Antonio River, the Iguazu River forms the boundary between Argentina and Brazil.<br /><br />Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).<br /><br />Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.<br /><br />Types of Waterfalls<br />One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.<br /><br />A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.<br /><br />A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.<br /><br />A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.<br /><br />A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three
Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.

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#trendingnow" src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/-2nHYrdRHDkI/VMLYHVCbM4I/AAAAAAAACt4/Oj2fglzPalc/Iguazu%252520Falls.gif" width="100" height="100" />
Amazing Waterfall<br /><br />Please See Water Fall http://goo.gl/KZRnDU<br /><br />Enjoy our fun waterfall facts for kids. Learn interesting information about waterfalls including where they are found, how waterfalls form, different types, how they are used to produce electricity and much more. Read on to find out everything you’ve ever wanted to know about waterfalls!<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, often landing in a plunge pool below.<br /><br />Erosion plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. As a stream flows, it carries sediment that can erode the soft bed rock (limestone and sandstone) underneath. Eventually this cuts deep enough so that only harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as the granite forms cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion. Stream velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can flatten rocks at the edge. The plunge pool at the base gets bigger as rushing water and sediment erodes it and the area behind the waterfall is worn away, creating cave-like shelters.<br /><br />Other process that form waterfalls include earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcanoes which can disrupt the land of a stream bed creating cliffs, cracks, faults and other changes in elevation.<br /><br />The tallest waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela where the water falls 979 m (3,212 ft). The fall is so long that at warmer times of the year the water turns into mist before it reaches the stream below.<br /><br />The valley of Lauterbrunnen in Switzerland is a deep glacial formed valley that contains 72 waterfalls. The streams flowing from the mountains on either side, reach the rocky verge walls of the valley and cascade over. The most famous of the waterfalls is the Staubbach Falls less than 1 km from Lauterbrunnen village.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br /><br />Source +Edward Gustavson<br /><br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography   #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #victoria #zimbabwe #zambia #africa #african #zimbabwean #zambian <br />#mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography    
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Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


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#gifofthedayindeed"> Amazing Waterfalls<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is a river or other body of water's steep fall over a rocky ledge into a plunge pool below. Waterfalls are also called cascades.<br /><br />The process of erosion, the wearing away of earth, plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion.<br /><br />Often, waterfalls form as streams flow from soft rock to hard rock. This happens both laterally (as a stream flows across the earth) and vertically (as the stream drops in a waterfall). In both cases, the soft rock erodes, leaving a hard ledge over which the stream falls.<br /><br />A fall line is the imaginary line along which parallel rivers plunge as they flow from uplands to lowlands. Many waterfalls in an area help geologists and hydrologists determine a region's fall line and underlying rock structure.<br /><br />As a stream flows, it carries sediment. The sediment can be microscopic silt, pebbles, or even boulders. Sediment can erode stream beds made of soft rock, such as sandstone or limestone. Eventually, the stream's channel cuts so deep into the stream bed that only a harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as these granite formations form cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />A stream's velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion taking place. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can erode rocks to be very flat and smooth. Rushing water and sediment topple over the waterfall, eroding the plunge pool at the base. The crashing flow of the water may also create powerful whirlpools that erode the rock of the plunge pool beneath them.<br /><br />The resulting erosion at the base of a waterfall can be very dramatic, and cause the waterfall to
Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
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#gifofthedayindeed" src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/--zA-Mhcr7_c/VMEpMyiltoI/AAAAAAAAA9o/DCvMD4TxQwk/Edward.gif" width="100" height="100" />
Amazing Waterfall<br /><br /><br />Enjoy our fun waterfall facts for kids. Learn interesting information about waterfalls including where they are found, how waterfalls form, different types, how they are used to produce electricity and much more. Read on to find out everything you’ve ever wanted to know about waterfalls!<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, often landing in a plunge pool below.<br /><br />Erosion plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. As a stream flows, it carries sediment that can erode the soft bed rock (limestone and sandstone) underneath. Eventually this cuts deep enough so that only harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as the granite forms cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion. Stream velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can flatten rocks at the edge. The plunge pool at the base gets bigger as rushing water and sediment erodes it and the area behind the waterfall is worn away, creating cave-like shelters.<br /><br />Other process that form waterfalls include earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcanoes which can disrupt the land of a stream bed creating cliffs, cracks, faults and other changes in elevation.<br /><br />The tallest waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela where the water falls 979 m (3,212 ft). The fall is so long that at warmer times of the year the water turns into mist before it reaches the stream below.<br /><br />The valley of Lauterbrunnen in Switzerland is a deep glacial formed valley that contains 72 waterfalls. The streams flowing from the mountains on either side, reach the rocky verge walls of the valley and cascade over. The most famous of the waterfalls is the Staubbach Falls less than 1 km from Lauterbrunnen village.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br /><br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography   #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #victoria #zimbabwe #zambia #africa #african #zimbabwean #zambian <br />#mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography    
#Testing your #pool #water to have it ready for the weekend is ideal to kept your pool in good condition. We do it for #FREE!!!! Bring us in some water, and let us get those pools ready for more swimming

HAND SKIMMER: A screen attached to a frame which is then attached to a telescopic pole used to remove large floating debris, such as leaves and bugs, from the water's surface.

HEATER: A fossil-fueled, electric or solar device used to heat the water of a pool, hot tub or hot tub.

NEUTRALIZER: A chemical used to make chlorine or bromine harmless. Used in test kits to counteract the bleaching effect of the chlorine or bromine in order to increase the accuracy of pool water tests. Sold as chlorine and bromine neutralizer, it is used to destroy excessive amounts of chlorine or bromine so the high levels will not affect swimmers.

OXIDIZER: A non-chlorine shocking compound that removes or destroys built-up contaminants and chloramines in pool water without raising chlorine levels.

PUMP: A mechanical device, usually powered by an electric motor, which causes hydraulic flow and pressure for the purpose of filtration, heating and circulation of pool and hot tub water. Typically, a centrifugal pump is used for pools, spas and hot tubs.

PUMP CAPACITY: The volume of liquid a pump is capable of moving during a specified period of time. This is usually listed in gallons per minute or gpm.

pH: Abbreviation for Potential Hydrogen. Indicates the level of acidity or alkalinity of water on a scale ranging from 0-15. A low pH can cause etched plaster, metal corrosion and eye irritation. A high pH can cause scale formation, chlorine inefficiency and eye irritation. The ideal range for pH in swimming pools is typically 7.4 to 7.6.

SANITIZERS: Chemical compounds designed to kill bacteria, algae and other living organisms. Also protects water from the effects of the sun.

SHOCK TREATMENT: The practice of adding significant amounts of an oxidizing chemical -- (usually non-chlorine oxidizers, such as sodium persulfate or potassium peroxymonosulfate) -- to the water to destroy ammonia and nitrogen compounds caused by swimmers, the environment and/or weather.

SKIMMER: A device installed through the wall of a pool or hot tub that is connected to the suction line of the pump that draws water and floating debris in the water flow from the surface without causing much flow restriction.

SKIMMER BASKET: A removable, slotted basket or strainer placed in the skimmer on the suction side of the pump, which is designed to trap floating debris in the water flow from the surface without causing flow restriction.

TEST KIT: An apparatus or device used to monitor specific chemical residuals, levels, constituents or demands in pool or hot tub water. The most common pool and hot tub water tests are: pH, total alkalinity, free available chlorine, water hardness, cyanuric acid, iron and copper.

TURBIDITY: The cloudy condition of the water due to the presence of extremely fine particles in suspension that cannot be trapped by the filter because they are too small. Adding a clarifier, such as an organic polymer or alum, will coagulate the particles and make the filter more efficient.

WATER CLARIFIER: Also called coagulant or flocculant . A chemical compound used to gather (coagulate or agglomerate) or to precipitate suspended particles so they may be removed by vacuuming or filtration. There are two types; inorganic salts of aluminum (alum) and other metals or water-soluble organic polyelectrolytes.

WEIR: The small floating "door" on the side of the skimmer that faces the water over which water flows on its way to the skimmer. Adjusts automatically to small changes in water level to assure a continuous flow of water to the skimmer. The weir also prevents debris from floating back into the pool after the pump shuts off. Also known as a skimmer weir.">GLOSSARY OF POOL TERMS from swimmingpool.com<br /><br />AIR-RELIEF VALVE: A manually-operated  valve located at the top of a filter tank for relieving the pressure inside the filter and removing the air inside the filter (bleeding the filter). Also known as a pressure-relief valve.<br /><br />ALGAE: Microscopic plant-like organisms that contain chlorophyll. Algae is nourished by carbon dioxide (CO2) and use sunlight to carry out photosynthesis. It can be introduced by rain or wind and grows in colonies, producing nuisance masses. Algae can harbor bacteria and can be slippery. There are thousands of known species of algae. The most common types of algae found in pools are black, blue-green, green and mustard .<br /><br />ALGAECIDES: Chemical compounds designed to kill, prevent and control algae.<br /><br />AUTOMATIC POOL CLEANER: A pool maintenance system that will agitate and/or vacuum debris from the pool interior automatically.<br /><br />BACKFLOW: The backing up of water through a pipe in the direction opposite to normal flow.<br /><br />BACKWASH: The process of thoroughly cleaning the filter by reversing the flow of water through it with the dirt and rinse water going to waste.<br /><br />BALANCERS: Chemical compound designed to prevent corrosion and staining by balancing the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness in pool water.<br /><br />BROMIDE: A common term for a bromide salt used to supply bromide ions to the water so they may be oxidized or changed into hypobromous acid. Used as a disinfectant.<br /><br />BROMINE: A common name for a chemical compound containing bromine that is used as a disinfectant to destroy bacteria and algae in swimming pools and spas.<br /><br />CENTRIFUGAL PUMP: A pump consisting of an impeller fixed on a rotating shaft and enclosed in a casing or volute and having an inlet and a discharge connection. The rotating impeller creates pressure in the water by the velocity derived from the centrifugal force.<br /><br />CHECK VALVE: A mechanical device in a pipe that permits the flow of water or air in one direction only.<br /><br />CHEMICAL FEEDER: A device that dispenses chemicals into pool or hot tub water at a predetermined rate. Some dispense chlorine or bromine while others dispense pH-adjusting chemicals.<br /><br />CHLORINE NEUTRALIZER: A chemical used to make chlorine harmless. Used in test kits to counteract the bleaching effect of the chlorine or bromine in order to increase the accuracy of pool water tests. Sold as chlorine and bromine neutralizer, it is used to destroy excessive amounts of chlorine or bromine so the high levels will not affect swimmers.<br /><br />CHLORINE: A term used to describe any type of chlorine compound used as a disinfectant in swimming pool and hot tub water or to kill, destroy or control bacteria and algae. In addition, chlorine oxidizes ammonia and nitrogen compounds cause by swimmers.<br /><br />COPING: The cap or top lip on the pool or hot tub wall that provides a finished edge around the pool or spa.<br /><br />CORROSION: The etching, pitting or eating away of the pool or hot tub or equipment. Can be caused by improper water balance, misuse of acid or acidic products or from soft water.<br /><br />COVER, SOLAR: A cover that, when placed on the water's surface of a pool, hot tub or hot tub, increases the water temperature by absorption and transmission of solar radiation; reduces evaporation and prevents debris from entering the water.<br /><br />D.E.: Diatomaceous Earth — a porous substance used in certain types of pool filters.<br /><br />DRAIN: This term usually refers to a plumbing fitting installed on the suction side of the pump in pools, spas and hot tubs. Sometimes called the main drain, it is located in the deepest part of the pool, hot tub or hot tub. It does not function like a drain on a kitchen sink. Pool main drains do not allow the water to drain to waste but rather connect to the pump for circulation and filtration.<br /><br />FIBERGLASS: Finespun filaments of glass which are available in a rope or mat form. When used in a process with polyester resins, catalysts and hardeners, can be formed or molded into pools and spas.<br /><br />FILTER: A device that removes dissolved or suspended particles from water by recirculating the water through a porous substance (a filter medium or element). The three types of filters used in pools and spas are sand, cartridge and D.E. (diatomaceous earth).<br /><br />FILTRATION RATE: The rate at which the water is traveling through the filter, expressed in U.S. gallons per minute (gpm) per square foot of filter area.<br /><br />FLOW RATE: The quantity of water flowing past a designated point within a specified time, such as the number of gallons flowing past a point in 1 minute — also known as gallons per minute or gpm.<br /><br />GUNITE: A mixture of cement and sand sprayed onto contoured and supported surfaces to build a pool. Gunite is mixed and pumped to the site dry, and water is added at the point of application. Plaster is usually applied over the gunite.<br /><br />GUTTER: An overflow trough at the edge of the pool through which floating debris, oil and other
HAND SKIMMER: A screen attached to a frame which is then attached to a telescopic pole used to remove large floating debris, such as leaves and bugs, from the water's surface.

HEATER: A fossil-fueled, electric or solar device used to heat the water of a pool, hot tub or hot tub.

NEUTRALIZER: A chemical used to make chlorine or bromine harmless. Used in test kits to counteract the bleaching effect of the chlorine or bromine in order to increase the accuracy of pool water tests. Sold as chlorine and bromine neutralizer, it is used to destroy excessive amounts of chlorine or bromine so the high levels will not affect swimmers.

OXIDIZER: A non-chlorine shocking compound that removes or destroys built-up contaminants and chloramines in pool water without raising chlorine levels.

PUMP: A mechanical device, usually powered by an electric motor, which causes hydraulic flow and pressure for the purpose of filtration, heating and circulation of pool and hot tub water. Typically, a centrifugal pump is used for pools, spas and hot tubs.

PUMP CAPACITY: The volume of liquid a pump is capable of moving during a specified period of time. This is usually listed in gallons per minute or gpm.

pH: Abbreviation for Potential Hydrogen. Indicates the level of acidity or alkalinity of water on a scale ranging from 0-15. A low pH can cause etched plaster, metal corrosion and eye irritation. A high pH can cause scale formation, chlorine inefficiency and eye irritation. The ideal range for pH in swimming pools is typically 7.4 to 7.6.

SANITIZERS: Chemical compounds designed to kill bacteria, algae and other living organisms. Also protects water from the effects of the sun.

SHOCK TREATMENT: The practice of adding significant amounts of an oxidizing chemical -- (usually non-chlorine oxidizers, such as sodium persulfate or potassium peroxymonosulfate) -- to the water to destroy ammonia and nitrogen compounds caused by swimmers, the environment and/or weather.

SKIMMER: A device installed through the wall of a pool or hot tub that is connected to the suction line of the pump that draws water and floating debris in the water flow from the surface without causing much flow restriction.

SKIMMER BASKET: A removable, slotted basket or strainer placed in the skimmer on the suction side of the pump, which is designed to trap floating debris in the water flow from the surface without causing flow restriction.

TEST KIT: An apparatus or device used to monitor specific chemical residuals, levels, constituents or demands in pool or hot tub water. The most common pool and hot tub water tests are: pH, total alkalinity, free available chlorine, water hardness, cyanuric acid, iron and copper.

TURBIDITY: The cloudy condition of the water due to the presence of extremely fine particles in suspension that cannot be trapped by the filter because they are too small. Adding a clarifier, such as an organic polymer or alum, will coagulate the particles and make the filter more efficient.

WATER CLARIFIER: Also called coagulant or flocculant . A chemical compound used to gather (coagulate or agglomerate) or to precipitate suspended particles so they may be removed by vacuuming or filtration. There are two types; inorganic salts of aluminum (alum) and other metals or water-soluble organic polyelectrolytes.

WEIR: The small floating "door" on the side of the skimmer that faces the water over which water flows on its way to the skimmer. Adjusts automatically to small changes in water level to assure a continuous flow of water to the skimmer. The weir also prevents debris from floating back into the pool after the pump shuts off. Also known as a skimmer weir." src="http://lh4.ggpht.com/-_YVGoM2U948/VMBogqxdinI/AAAAAAAAAJg/BDcNpueC0WI/14389.jpg" width="100" height="100" />
GMS stain for Coccidoides immitis.
Watch this on-demand webinar to learn how to increase efficiencies by streamlining the workflow in your food microbiology testing laboratory.<br /><br />Link to webinar:<br /><br />http://chrom.so/1yG4MDG

Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
#gifofthedayindeed">Amazing Waterfalls<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is a river or other body of water's steep fall over a rocky ledge into a plunge pool below. Waterfalls are also called cascades.<br /><br />The process of erosion, the wearing away of earth, plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion.<br /><br />Often, waterfalls form as streams flow from soft rock to hard rock. This happens both laterally (as a stream flows across the earth) and vertically (as the stream drops in a waterfall). In both cases, the soft rock erodes, leaving a hard ledge over which the stream falls.<br /><br />A fall line is the imaginary line along which parallel rivers plunge as they flow from uplands to lowlands. Many waterfalls in an area help geologists and hydrologists determine a region's fall line and underlying rock structure.<br /><br />As a stream flows, it carries sediment. The sediment can be microscopic silt, pebbles, or even boulders. Sediment can erode stream beds made of soft rock, such as sandstone or limestone. Eventually, the stream's channel cuts so deep into the stream bed that only a harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as these granite formations form cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />A stream's velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion taking place. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can erode rocks to be very flat and smooth. Rushing water and sediment topple over the waterfall, eroding the plunge pool at the base. The crashing flow of the water may also create powerful whirlpools that erode the rock of the plunge pool beneath them.<br /><br />The resulting erosion at the base of a waterfall can be very dramatic, and cause the waterfall to
Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
#gifofthedayindeed" src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/-CouE1XQNRZ0/VL6Edh46xXI/AAAAAAAAA64/fO_DFJ4vs9o/Cynthia%252520-%252520Don%252520-%252520Waterfall%252520...gif" width="100" height="100" />

Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
#gifofthedayindeed">Boom! You Can See Epic Ice Explosions in the Arctic.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />A waterfall is a river or other body of water's steep fall over a rocky ledge into a plunge pool below. Waterfalls are also called cascades.<br /><br />The process of erosion, the wearing away of earth, plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion.<br /><br />Often, waterfalls form as streams flow from soft rock to hard rock. This happens both laterally (as a stream flows across the earth) and vertically (as the stream drops in a waterfall). In both cases, the soft rock erodes, leaving a hard ledge over which the stream falls.<br /><br />A fall line is the imaginary line along which parallel rivers plunge as they flow from uplands to lowlands. Many waterfalls in an area help geologists and hydrologists determine a region's fall line and underlying rock structure.<br /><br />As a stream flows, it carries sediment. The sediment can be microscopic silt, pebbles, or even boulders. Sediment can erode stream beds made of soft rock, such as sandstone or limestone. Eventually, the stream's channel cuts so deep into the stream bed that only a harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as these granite formations form cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />A stream's velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion taking place. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can erode rocks to be very flat and smooth. Rushing water and sediment topple over the waterfall, eroding the plunge pool at the base. The crashing flow of the water may also create powerful whirlpools that erode the rock of the plunge pool beneath them.<br /><br />The resulting erosion at the base of a waterfall can be very dramatic, and cause the waterfall to
Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
#gifofthedayindeed" src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/-4xWidw6LQzQ/VL36AaRsvHI/AAAAAAAD_kw/iWLN_MkQ120/Don-%252520Vinny%252520-%252520Boom%252521%252520You%252520Can%252520See%252520Epic%252520Ice%252520Explosions%252520in%252520the%252520Arctic..gif" width="100" height="100" />
24CE131000000578-2916046-Testing_the_waters_Mecklenburgh_submerged_herself_into_the_pool_-a-95_1421628908532.jpg

Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls
The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.

Text source:  Kent Gustavson G+">A waterfall is a river or other body of water's steep fall over a rocky ledge into a plunge pool below. Waterfalls are also called cascades.<br /><br />The process of erosion, the wearing away of earth, plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion.<br /><br />Often, waterfalls form as streams flow from soft rock to hard rock. This happens both laterally (as a stream flows across the earth) and vertically (as the stream drops in a waterfall). In both cases, the soft rock erodes, leaving a hard ledge over which the stream falls.<br /><br />A fall line is the imaginary line along which parallel rivers plunge as they flow from uplands to lowlands. Many waterfalls in an area help geologists and hydrologists determine a region's fall line and underlying rock structure.<br /><br />As a stream flows, it carries sediment. The sediment can be microscopic silt, pebbles, or even boulders. Sediment can erode stream beds made of soft rock, such as sandstone or limestone. Eventually, the stream's channel cuts so deep into the stream bed that only a harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as these granite formations form cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />A stream's velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion taking place. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can erode rocks to be very flat and smooth. Rushing water and sediment topple over the waterfall, eroding the plunge pool at the base. The crashing flow of the water may also create powerful whirlpools that erode the rock of the plunge pool beneath them.<br /><br />The resulting erosion at the base of a waterfall can be very dramatic, and cause the waterfall to
Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls
The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.

Text source:  Kent Gustavson G+" src="http://lh3.ggpht.com/-asJWivSiYOE/VL3YVhuLeOI/AAAAAAAAKL8/DvVn6w3H-xA/gif%252520waterfall%252520bluetheme.gif" width="100" height="100" />

Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
#gifofthedayindeed">Amazing Waterfalls<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is a river or other body of water's steep fall over a rocky ledge into a plunge pool below. Waterfalls are also called cascades.<br /><br />The process of erosion, the wearing away of earth, plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion.<br /><br />Often, waterfalls form as streams flow from soft rock to hard rock. This happens both laterally (as a stream flows across the earth) and vertically (as the stream drops in a waterfall). In both cases, the soft rock erodes, leaving a hard ledge over which the stream falls.<br /><br />A fall line is the imaginary line along which parallel rivers plunge as they flow from uplands to lowlands. Many waterfalls in an area help geologists and hydrologists determine a region's fall line and underlying rock structure.<br /><br />As a stream flows, it carries sediment. The sediment can be microscopic silt, pebbles, or even boulders. Sediment can erode stream beds made of soft rock, such as sandstone or limestone. Eventually, the stream's channel cuts so deep into the stream bed that only a harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as these granite formations form cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />A stream's velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion taking place. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can erode rocks to be very flat and smooth. Rushing water and sediment topple over the waterfall, eroding the plunge pool at the base. The crashing flow of the water may also create powerful whirlpools that erode the rock of the plunge pool beneath them.<br /><br />The resulting erosion at the base of a waterfall can be very dramatic, and cause the waterfall to
Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.


#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
#gifofthedayindeed" src="http://lh6.ggpht.com/-YnF-BKfHUak/VL0e1qHa_5I/AAAAAAABLjk/A4NbPFMnPxU/kent..gif" width="100" height="100" />

Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.

#Waterfall
#Waterfalls
#Nature
#waterFallPhotography
#Travel
#NaturePhotography
#Landscape
#WaterfallWednesday
#Water
#River
#WaterfallWednesday
#gif #nature #naturegifs   #photography #travel #naturephotography #travelphotography #photooftheweek #trending #trendingnow #picoftheweek #spring #spring2014 #springphotography #springphotos #springpictures #springpics #naturephotos #naturepics #naturepictures #naturepicsoftheday #AwesomeGif
#StunningGif
#AmazingGif
#gifoftheday
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#AnnimatedGif
#trendingnow">“There is a hidden message in every waterfall. It says, if you are flexible, falling will not hurt you!” ― Mehmet Murat ildan<br /><br /><br />A waterfall is a river or other body of water's steep fall over a rocky ledge into a plunge pool below. Waterfalls are also called cascades.<br /><br />The process of erosion, the wearing away of earth, plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion.<br /><br />Often, waterfalls form as streams flow from soft rock to hard rock. This happens both laterally (as a stream flows across the earth) and vertically (as the stream drops in a waterfall). In both cases, the soft rock erodes, leaving a hard ledge over which the stream falls.<br /><br />A fall line is the imaginary line along which parallel rivers plunge as they flow from uplands to lowlands. Many waterfalls in an area help geologists and hydrologists determine a region's fall line and underlying rock structure.<br /><br />As a stream flows, it carries sediment. The sediment can be microscopic silt, pebbles, or even boulders. Sediment can erode stream beds made of soft rock, such as sandstone or limestone. Eventually, the stream's channel cuts so deep into the stream bed that only a harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as these granite formations form cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />A stream's velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion taking place. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can erode rocks to be very flat and smooth. Rushing water and sediment topple over the waterfall, eroding the plunge pool at the base. The crashing flow of the water may also create powerful whirlpools that erode the rock of the plunge pool beneath them.<br /><br />The resulting erosion at the base of a waterfall can be very dramatic, and cause the waterfall to
Erosion is just one process that can form waterfalls. A waterfall may form across a fault, or crack in the Earth’s surface. An earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcano may also disrupt stream beds and help create waterfalls.

Classifying Waterfalls

There is not a standard way to classify waterfalls. Some scientists classify waterfalls based on the average volume of water in the waterfall. A Class 10 waterfall using this scale is Inga Falls, Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Congo River twists in a series of rapids. The estimated volume of water discharged from Inga Falls is 25,768 cubic meters per second (910,000 cubic feet per second).

Another popular way of classifying waterfalls is by width. One of the widest waterfalls is Khone Phapheng Falls, Laos. At the Khone Phapheng Falls, the Mekong River flows through a succession of relatively shallow rapids. The width of the Khone Phapheng Falls is about 10,783 meters (35,376 feet).

Waterfalls are also classified by height. Angel Falls, the world’s tallest waterfall, plummets 979 meters (3,212 feet) into a remote canyon in a rain forest in Venezuela. The water, from the Gauja River, often does not reach the bottom. The fall is so long, and so steep, that air pressure is stronger often than the water pressure of the falls. The water is turned to mist before it reaches the small tributary below.

Types of Waterfalls
One of the most popular, if least scientific, ways to classify waterfalls is by type. A waterfall's type is simply the way the descends. Most waterfalls fit more than one category.

A block waterfall descends from a wide stream. Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall on the Niagara River.

A cascade is a waterfall that descends over a series of rock steps. Monkey Falls, in the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sanctuary and National Park in Tamil Nadu, India, is a gently sloping cascade. The waterfall is safe enough for children to play in the water.

A cataract is a powerful, even dangerous, waterfall. Among the widest and wildest of cataracts are the thundering waters of the Iguazu River on the border between Brazil and Argentina.

A chute is a waterfall in which the stream passage is very narrow, forcing water through at unusually high pressure. Three Chute Falls is named for the three "chutes" through which the Tenaya Creek falls in Yosemite National Park, California.

Fan waterfalls are named for their shape. Water spreads out horizontally as it descends. Virgin Falls is a striking fan waterfall on Tofino Creek, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

Frozen waterfalls are just what they sound like. For at least part of the year, the waterfall freezes. Mountaineers often climb frozen waterfalls as a challenging test of their skill. The Fang is a single pillar of ice in Vail, Colorado that vertically plunges more than 30 meters (100 feet).

Horsetail waterfalls maintain contact with the hard rock that underlies them. Reichenbach Falls, a fall on the Reichenbach Stream in Switzerland, is a horsetail waterfall where legendary detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his doom.

Multi-step waterfalls are a series of connected waterfalls, each with their own plunge pool. The breathtaking "falling lakes" of Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia, are a series of multi-step waterfalls.

Plunge waterfalls, unlike horsetail falls, lose contact with the hard rock. The tallest waterfall in Japan, Hannoki Falls, is a plunge waterfall that stands 497 meters (1,640 feet). Hannoki Falls is seasonally fed by snowmelt from the Tateyama Mountains.

Punchbowl waterfalls are characterized by wide pools at their base. Wailua Falls is a punchbowl waterfall on the island of Kauai, Hawaii. Although the plunge pool is tranquil and popular for swimming, the area around Wailua Falls itself is dangerous.

The water flowing over segmented waterfalls separate as distinct streams. Huge outcroppings of hard rock separate the streams of Nigretta Falls, a segmented waterfall in Victoria, Australia, before they meet in a large plunge pool.

Case Study: Niagara Falls

The Niagara River has two falls, one in the U.S. state of New York and one in the province of Ontario, Canada. Each waterfall is less than 60 meters (200 feet) tall, but together they are more than a kilometer (.62 miles) wide.

Niagara and many other falls with large volumes of water are used to generate hydroelectric power. A tremendous volume of water flows over Niagara Falls, as much as 5,525 cubic meters (195,000 cubic feet) per second. Power stations upstream from the falls convert hydroelectric energy into electricity for residential and commercial use.

The U.S. and Canadian governments manage the Niagara River so carefully that it is possible for either country to "turn off" the falls. This is done at night, so as not to disturb the tourism industry, and the falls are never actually turned off, just slowed down. Water is diverted to canals and reservoirs, and the decreased flow allows engineers to check for erosion and other damage on the falls. U.S. and Canadian authorities also work together to ensure Niagara Falls doesn’t freeze in the winter, which would threaten power production.

Because waterfalls are barriers to navigation, canals are sometimes built to get around them. Niagara Falls prevents passage between Lake Erie and Lake Ontario on the Niagara River. In the 19th century, the Welland Canal was built to make passage between the two Great Lakes possible.

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   A waterfall is an area of...

   A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, often landing in a plunge pool below.<br /><br /><br /><br />Enjoy our fun waterfall facts for kids. Learn interesting information about waterfalls including where they are found, how waterfalls form, different types, how they are used to produce electricity and much more. Read on to find out everything you’ve ever wanted to know about waterfalls!<br /><br /><br /><br />Erosion plays an important part in the formation of waterfalls. As a stream flows, it carries sediment that can erode the soft bed rock (limestone and sandstone) underneath. Eventually this cuts deep enough so that only harder rock, such as granite, remains. Waterfalls develop as the granite forms cliffs and ledges.<br /><br />Waterfalls themselves also contribute to erosion. Stream velocity increases as it nears a waterfall, increasing the amount of erosion. The movement of water at the top of a waterfall can flatten rocks at the edge. The plunge pool at the base gets bigger as rushing water and sediment erodes it and the area behind the waterfall is worn away, creating cave-like shelters.<br /><br />Other process that form waterfalls include earthquake, landslide, glacier, or volcanoes which can disrupt the land of a stream bed creating cliffs, cracks, faults and other changes in elevation.<br /><br />The tallest waterfall in the world is Angel Falls in Venezuela where the water falls 979 m (3,212 ft). The fall is so long that at warmer times of the year the water turns into mist before it reaches the stream below.<br /><br />The valley of Lauterbrunnen in Switzerland is a deep glacial formed valley that contains 72 waterfalls. The streams flowing from the mountains on either side, reach the rocky verge walls of the valley and cascade over. The most famous of the waterfalls is the Staubbach Falls less than 1 km from Lauterbrunnen village.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be classified by type. There are many types of waterfalls and it is possible for a waterfall to fit more than one category.<br /><br />Ledge (Classical, Curtain) waterfalls descend vertically over a cliff maintaining partial contact with the bedrock.<br /><br />Block (Sheet) waterfalls descend from a wide stream or river, Niagara Falls, in the U.S. and Canada, is a block waterfall.<br /><br />Cascade waterfalls descend over a series of rock steps, they are usually a relatively safe type of waterfall. Monkey Falls, in India is an example.<br /><br />Cataract waterfalls are large, powerful and often dangerous. A very wide and wild cataract fall is the Iguazu River at the Brazil and Argentina border.<br /><br />Chute waterfalls force a large amount of water through narrow vertical passages at a high pressure. For example, Three Chute Falls, Yosemite National Park, US.<br /><br />Fan waterfalls are like the name suggests, as the water descends it spreads out horizontally. Virgin Falls is a fan waterfall in British Columbia, Canada.<br /><br />Frozen waterfalls will freeze over for at least part of the year. Mountaineers often test their skills by climbing frozen waterfalls. E.g. The Fang, Vail, Colorado, US.<br /><br />Horsetail waterfalls will maintain contact with the bedrock underneath them. The Reichenbach Falls, in Switzerland, is such a waterfall which is famous for being where fictional detective Sherlock Holmes allegedly fell to his death.<br /><br />Multi-step (Tiered or Staircase) waterfalls are a series of waterfalls falling one after the other each with their own plunge pool. The falling lakes of Plitvice Lakes National Park, in Croatia, are an example of multi-step waterfalls.<br /><br />Plunge waterfalls are fast moving with horizontal thrust over the edge causing the water to completely lose contact with the bedrock, e.g. Japan's Hannoki Falls.<br /><br />Punchbowl waterfalls descend in a constricted form that spreads out into a wide pool at their base. Wailua Falls in Hawaii is an example of a punchbowl waterfall.<br /><br />Segmented waterfalls form separate flows of water as they descend. The Nigretta Falls in Victoria, Australia, have separate streams that join back up in the pool.<br /><br />Many waterfalls around the world are used to generate hydroelectric power.<br /><br />Waterfalls can be grouped into 10 broad classes based on the average volume of water going over falls. Class 10 waterfalls include Niagara Falls, Khone Falls and Inga Falls. Victoria Falls (Class 9), Gullfoss (Class 8), Angel Falls (Class 7), Yosemite Falls (Class 6), Sutherland Falls (Class 5).<br /><br />#waterfall   #waterfalls #water #fall #Wilderness #Rivers #NationalPark #waterfallphotography   #waterfallsphotography #waterfallphotos #tour #tourism #tourism #touristdestination #touristattractions #touristspot #touristplaces #travel #tourist #natural #naturalbeauty #nature #naturephotography #naturepics #naturephotos #wallpaper #victoria #zimbabwe #zambia #africa #african #zimbabwean #zambian <br />#mountains   #Lakes #Waterfall #Waterfalls #Waterscape #forest #Landscape #Outdoor #Rural #Countryside #Trees #Lake #clouds #sky #long #exposure #purity #earth #beauty #beautiful #places #Photography    

   A waterfall is an area of a river or stream where the water flows over a steep vertical drop, o...

 
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City’s Lifeguards Make Waves...

City’s Lifeguards Make Waves At Annual Challenge Event<br /><br />Lifeguards from leisure centres across the city put their skills to the test to see who would be crowned Leeds's top poolside patrollers. The annual Leeds Lifeguard Challenge saw the team from Kirkstall Leisure Centre emerge as the overall winners after a day of competition which included first aid simulations and relay races. Now in its 19th year, the friendly contest is designed to help recognise the city's lifeguards while they practice their key skills and work as a team. Held at the John Charles Centre for Sport, the event saw ten teams from Aireborough, Armley, Holt Park, John Charles, John Smeaton, Kippax, Kirkstall, Pudsey, Rothwell and Scott Hall centres battle it out. Other winners on the day included Holt Park Active, who were victorious in a rope throw relay, and Scott Hall Leisure Centre, who were the best in the simulated pool incident. Mark Sugden, centre manager at Kirkstall Leisure Centre, said: “The team really enjoyed the day and we're all very proud that they were named overall winners. “It's great that they've got the recognition they deserve and also had to chance to work alongside teams from other centres and practice their skills.” Leeds City Council lifeguards undergo National Pool Lifeguard Qualification training which includes water rescue, spinal injury management, life support and first aid. The John Charles Centre was also named the Royal Life Saving Society's approved training centre of the year for 2013. Councillor Lucinda Yeadon, Leeds City Council's executive member for digital and creative technologies, culture and skills, said: “The Lifeguard Challenge is always a really fun and exciting day that gives our lifeguards a great chance to get together for a bit of friendly competition. “But it also highlights the important role they play in keeping thousands of swimmers across the city safe each and every day as they enjoy our pools and leisure centres. “Lifeguards have to be constantly alert and ready to act at any time and they're a real credit to the city. Congratulations to the team at Kirkstall Leisure Centre too on a well-deserved win.” For more information on Leeds's lifeguard training, visit: http://www.leeds.gov.uk/sports/Pages/Coach-education.aspx Source: http://www.yorkshiretimes.co.uk/<br />http://leedsinnews.com/citys-lifeguards-make-waves-at-annual-challenge-event-2/

City’s Lifeguards Make Waves At Annual Challenge Event

Lifeguards from leisure centres across the...

 
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